Category Archives: Articles on Painting

Under 30’s to Watch

Fresh Irish painters: 10 under 30 to watch – selected for the RTE blog by Cristín Leech, art critic of The Sunday Times. Seven of the ten graduated from NCAD.

Darragh Dempsey, A Matter of Time, 206, oil on birch plywood, 30.2x45.5 cm

Darragh Dempsey, A Matter of Time, 206, oil on birch plywood, 30.2×45.5 cm

Amanda Doran, Dead, 2013, Oil on Board

Amanda Doran, Dead, 2013, Oil on Board

Joe Scullion, Off Course, 2014, oil on board, 44.5x40cm

Joe Scullion, Off Course, 2014, oil on board, 44.5x40cm

 

Eileen O’Sullivan, Unceremonious, II, oil on canvas, 2016

Eileen O’Sullivan, Unceremonious, II, oil on canvas, 2016

Jane Rainey, Sun Burst, oil on canvas, 2016, 50x40cm

Jane Rainey, Sun Burst, oil on canvas, 2016, 50x40cm

Shane Berkery, oil on canvas

Shane Berkery, oil on canvas

Chanelle Walshe, Telesthesia, oil on board. 50x40cm. 2015

Chanelle Walshe, Telesthesia, oil on board. 50x40cm. 2015

Click on artists names and be taken to their websites:

Darragh Dempsey, Amanda Doran, Eileen O’Sullivan, Jane Rainey, Shane Berkery, Chanelle Walshe                     

Posted by Robert Armstrong

Jane Rainey – MFA Graduate, 2016

Jane Rainey, oil on canvas, 2016

Jane Rainey, Toxicity, oil on canvas, 40 x 50cm, 2016

 

The paintings often describe no specific events, with the beginning, the end and the transgressive or progressive middle, often folding in on each other. The works are always in a state of flux, living somewhere in-between representation and abstraction, depicting things that are of this world but also not of this world. Tangible things that you can almost touch collide with unrecognisable abstract marks that are very much involved and about the act of painting. The worlds are suspended in time, with no sense of gravity, living within a liminal space that is neither here nor there. Bright in colour the works pulsate against each other causing harmonious connections as well as uneasy clashes. A sense of overwhelming uneasy and awkwardness occupy the painting, alluding that all is not what it seems.

Jane Rainey, oil on canvas, 2016

Jane Rainey, In Response to the infinite Scream of Nature,oil on canvas, 40 x 50 cm. 2016

Jane Rainey, oil on canvas, 2016

Jane Rainey, Witches Broom,oil on canvas, 120 x 150 cm, 2016

Jane Rainey, oil on canvas, 2016

Jane Rainey,The Man behind the Curtain, oil on canvas, 90 x 120 cm,2016

Jane Rainey website

Joseph Heffernan – MFA Graduate, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, Cityscape, oil on canvas, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, Cityscape, oil on panel, 40 x 30 cm, 2016

The Paintings are about the day-to-day activities of being in the studio and the Quixotic nature of the working process. The characters in the paintings are ones that I chose to bring in to the studio for narrative reasons. This narrative involves a theatrical conflict between abstraction and figuration, play-fullness and melancholy, hopefulness and despair, and is used as a vehicle or stage for exploring the absurdity of things.        Joseph Heffernan

Joseph Heffernan, Flume, oil on panel, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, Flume, oil on panel, 25 x 20 cm, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, Crusade, oil on canvas, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, Crusade, oil on panel, 30 x 40 cm, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, The Comedian, oil on panel, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, The Comedian, oil on panel, 25 x 15 cm, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, The Rehearsal, oil on canvas, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, The Rehearsal, oil on panel, 90 x 70 cm 2016

Kiran Riaz – MFA Graduate, 2016

Kiran Riaz, East meets West, digital print on canvas, 8' x 5', 2016

Kiran Riaz, East meets West, digital print on canvas, 8′ x 5′, 2016

Kiran Riaz grew up in Pakistan and moved to Dublin for her MFA. Her practice revolves around the counterbalance between Western and Eastern cultures. The work deals with cultural perceptions and her own experience of living between East and West. Riaz explores beauty, terrorism, religion and stereotypes of Eastern men as adversaries post 9/11. She has combined the Pakistani textile motif of Ajarak with Irish lace patterns in a mosaic format, using Photoshop software and traditional miniature painting. The work alludes to the mysteries and layers of visual storytelling from both societies, by revealing and concealing our combined histories.

Kiran Riaz, Untitled, acrylic on canvass, 12 x 12 inches, 2016

Kiran Riaz, Untitled, acrylic on canvass, 12 x 12 inches, 2016

Kiran Riaz, performance, sketch printing on T-shirt, (Austin Hearne), 2016

Kiran Riaz, performance, sketch printing on T-shirt, (Austin Hearne), 2016

Kiran Riaz, Who am I, colour pencil, on canvas, 2016

Kiran Riaz, Who am I, colour pencil, on canvas, 2016

Kiran Riaz, Untitled, acrylics on canvas, 20x20 cm, 2016

Kiran Riaz, Untitled, acrylics on canvas, 20×20 cm, 2016

www.kiranriazart.com

Jan Pleitner – Water for the Tribe

Jan Pleitner, Water for the Tribe, Kerlin Gallery

Jan Pleitner, Water for the Tribe, Kerlin Gallery

An odd sound now pervades the Kerlin Gallery in Dublin. The almost in-audible high octave frequency rings from the ten Jan Pleitner paintings hung on its walls. The fast paced thud, thud, thud of the painting’s lines form jittering, sweeping, scratches of folding colour that have a distinct harmonic resonance, organic in nature yet distantly mechanistic.

It may come then as no surprise that Pleitner often completes a work in a single session, while listening to techno music. The painting’s metallic droning colours share a tempo with techno, which in turn atavistically follow the lineage of the shamanistic drum circle, both utilising a repetitive, boundary dissolving rhythmic structure. As we move in dark spaces intermittently interrupted by pulsing lights, listening to machine beat wailing, the fireside dancing of our ancient past does not seem so distant. Our collective desire to dissolve ourselves into our external reality is manifested visually in Pleitner’s painting. When standing in front of one with a spirit of generosity, the boundary between the dichotomies of subject/object relaxes ever so slightly. We are gifted with an almost formless expanse of shifting oscillations and deep nothings, which acknowledge our innate connection to the numen.

Jan Pleitner, Untitled, 2015, oil on canvas, 200 x 300 cm / 78.7 x 118.1 in

Jan Pleitner, Untitled, 2015, oil on canvas, 200 x 300 cm / 78.7 x 118.1 in

According to the press release the exhibition’s title Water for the Tribe is a reference to Frank Herbert’s science fiction epic Dune, indicating a techno-foundation of future oriented, fast flowing, cinematic interconnectivity. This space exploring futurism functions as one side of a coin, whose other face remains rooted in the organic and the archaic. He succeeds in evoking the pulsing lights of a Neo-Tokyo while simultaneously drawing on the psychedelic dreamscapes of tribal shamanism. This is played out across ten canvas through rapid scratching, scraping, blurring and removing of paint which has evidently often come straight from the tube. The technique is qualitatively fast. Speed functions here as a key value resulting in a kind of high key naturalism that is both visionary and mechanical. Scale and colour ultimately determine the subtle differences between individual works, but in their affect they all function similarly.

Jan Pleitner, Untitled, 2015, oil on canvas, 230 x 140 cm / 90.6 x 55.1 in

Jan Pleitner, Untitled, 2015, oil on canvas, 230 x 140 cm / 90.6 x 55.1 in

Pleitner’s rich synesthetic cadences draw on our electric extensions and our private chthonic moments. What we see in his paintings is what largely goes unseen; the currency of being. His paintings are an isthmus of force between our known and unknown realities. Bold and striking, Water for the Tribe is not to be missed.

Fergal Styles

Stranger Shores

Article by Michael Hill:

Stranger Shores is an exhibition taking place at the Fenderesky Gallery, Belfast, from May 21 to June 26, 2015. Curated by Peter Burns, it includes a total of thirty-nine paintings by John Albert Duigenan, Aileen Murphy, Sheila Rennick, and Burns himself. The many paintings, in a range of sizes and variety of media, depict myriad peculiar people, plants, visions, and environments in an extraordinary and vivid manner. Even the more commonplace characters seem to find themselves in compromising or stimulating scenarios. Despite the encyclopaedic diversity of the works in this exhibition, the four artists share a great sensitivity towards their subject matter and a most direct approach to confronting it. Some further observations are offered below:

Ancient Times, Oil on Canvas, Peter Burns

Ancient Times, Oil on Canvas, Peter Burns

“The colossal eye of a prehistoric lizard takes in a barren volcanic landscape during Ancient Times. His tongue flicks through the sulfuric air to the edge of the canvas. A tiny and unlikely hero reaches to pierce the beast’s throat with his lance – or perhaps it is a reluctant painter reaching with a giant brush to complete his menacing creation. In the background of the scene, lava and semen erupt violently towards a suspended vulva in an urgent race to propagate life in this primordial dawn.

Flower, Acrylic on Canvas, John Albert Duigenan

Flower, Acrylic on Canvas, John Albert Duigenan

A curtain of canvas is drawn back and hooked over the top of the stretcher, revealing a tottering monstrosity lurching forth from a cloud of talcum powder like Joseph Merrick uncovered to the world at a penny gaff show on the Whitechapel Road. Paint dribbles towards the base of the picture like sticky boiled sweets spat out by the Toddler.

Rose, oil on board, Aileen Murphy

Rose, oil on board, Aileen Murphy

A series of pensive felines peer across the gallery; their ears pricked forward inquisitivly at their chaotic neighbours. Shhhhhhhh. Their tightly curled bodies are wound up and ready to pounce or scram in an instant. The cats’ senses are attuned to the chemical substances permeating the air; pheromones surrounding them and painted in electric colours. Their hackles rise as they become acutely aware of every change in scent, heat or movement.

Rose and Mary’s Cat will remain perturbed by the sex and surrealism around them but tricolor Tom Cat reclines, head and tail out of the frame, as his pink penis protrudes from his body. Have you heard the way the cats yowl at night in the car park across the road from the gallery?

Some fruits and flowers also have barbed tips and prickly skin to ward away prying hands and insects but others welcome curious fingers and proboscises.

Megabats are frugivorous and nectarivorous. They either have sharp teeth to pierce hard fruit skins or long tongues that are inserted deep into a flower, collecting pollen on the way, which is then transferred to the next blossom. Cross-pollination allows the flora to reproduce, and hybrid strains of a species to emerge.

Some plants expel toxic fumes into the air or sweet perfumed flurries; others purify their atmosphere. The NASA Clean Air Study demonstrates that certain common household plants naturally remove toxins such as benzene, formaldehyde and trichloroethylene from the air helping to counteract the effects of sick building syndrome.

A Teacher checks his txts before class starts. New Message. 3Message. To restore 3 data services, please access your device settings. <Messages. Edit. Delete. He glances up and catches his own gaze in the staffroom mirror. Camera. Click. He stares blankly at his own self-portrait on the tiny greasy screen. He doesn’t notice the jizzing cocks and bulbous tits graffitied on the wall behind him. The biology students have done their homework.

Schoolboys in Wolves Clothes, Oil on Canvas, Sheila Rennick

Schoolboys in Wolves Clothes, Oil on Canvas, Sheila Rennick

In the classroom a protractor spins across one of the desks as a boy lurches back in his seat. Some of his fellow classmates look on or away in dismay. A pack of lads with wolf carcasses draped over their heads point their fingers at the startled teen. His face has morphed into that of a soured Guanajuato mummy. They pull their triggers. A simple sketch of a sunrise or utopian domed sanctuary drifts to the floor.

At the top of a candy-coloured precipice, a lone figure surveys a barren but beautiful landscape. Reminiscent of the Huangshan UNESCO World Heritage Site following a cataclysmic disaster, the nuclear scorched peaks with sparse unnatural foliage reach to the heavens. The Wanderer above the Sea of Fog is revealed to be American television and social media personality, Kim Kardashian. She clutches the shrunken head of her husband, rapper and entrepreneur, Kanye West. It is hard to imagine why she has undertaken this perilous journey and how she will survive in this newly emerging world.

Yesterday’s seductress Salome sits above her table like a disinterested Sheela na gig. A silver platter rests before her but rather than the head of a decapitated prophet, the small kitten on the scarlet table cloth next to her sniffs a rock-pool of baptised shellfish.

A fried egg plummets through the blackness of space towards a copulating couple within the screen of a tiny television. The aerial is tuned to the correct frequency and it takes a second to realise that it is the bed shuddering and not the transmitted image. But it’s not going to happen tonight. An egg needs to be fertilised and incubated before a world can be created, before life can emerge, before an eye can open.”

Michael Hill, June 2015

Posted by Kristina Huxley

Burns and Noonan

Peter Burns, Crossroads, 2013

Peter Burns, Crossroads, 2013

Peter Burns and Mary Noonan both graduated in MFA at NCAD in 2009. Their exhibition at the Claremorris Gallery, County Mayo (until November 15) features works that conjure up a world both literally and metaphorically ‘beyond the pale’. Burns explores classical mythology and literary themes and Noonan delves deep into Irish folklore. View more images at the gallery website and read the accompanying essay by Gallery Director Rosemarie Noone here.

Mary Noonan, A Somewhat Unusual Sight, 2013

Mary Noonan, A Somewhat Unusual Sight, 2013

Posted by Robert Armstrong