Tag Archives: NCAD

Under 30’s to Watch

Fresh Irish painters: 10 under 30 to watch – selected for the RTE blog by Cristín Leech, art critic of The Sunday Times. Seven of the ten graduated from NCAD.

Darragh Dempsey, A Matter of Time, 206, oil on birch plywood, 30.2x45.5 cm

Darragh Dempsey, A Matter of Time, 206, oil on birch plywood, 30.2×45.5 cm

Amanda Doran, Dead, 2013, Oil on Board

Amanda Doran, Dead, 2013, Oil on Board

Joe Scullion, Off Course, 2014, oil on board, 44.5x40cm

Joe Scullion, Off Course, 2014, oil on board, 44.5x40cm

 

Eileen O’Sullivan, Unceremonious, II, oil on canvas, 2016

Eileen O’Sullivan, Unceremonious, II, oil on canvas, 2016

Jane Rainey, Sun Burst, oil on canvas, 2016, 50x40cm

Jane Rainey, Sun Burst, oil on canvas, 2016, 50x40cm

Shane Berkery, oil on canvas

Shane Berkery, oil on canvas

Chanelle Walshe, Telesthesia, oil on board. 50x40cm. 2015

Chanelle Walshe, Telesthesia, oil on board. 50x40cm. 2015

Click on artists names and be taken to their websites:

Darragh Dempsey, Amanda Doran, Eileen O’Sullivan, Jane Rainey, Shane Berkery, Chanelle Walshe                     

Posted by Robert Armstrong

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Jane Rainey – MFA Graduate, 2016

Jane Rainey, oil on canvas, 2016

Jane Rainey, Toxicity, oil on canvas, 40 x 50cm, 2016

 

The paintings often describe no specific events, with the beginning, the end and the transgressive or progressive middle, often folding in on each other. The works are always in a state of flux, living somewhere in-between representation and abstraction, depicting things that are of this world but also not of this world. Tangible things that you can almost touch collide with unrecognisable abstract marks that are very much involved and about the act of painting. The worlds are suspended in time, with no sense of gravity, living within a liminal space that is neither here nor there. Bright in colour the works pulsate against each other causing harmonious connections as well as uneasy clashes. A sense of overwhelming uneasy and awkwardness occupy the painting, alluding that all is not what it seems.

Jane Rainey, oil on canvas, 2016

Jane Rainey, In Response to the infinite Scream of Nature,oil on canvas, 40 x 50 cm. 2016

Jane Rainey, oil on canvas, 2016

Jane Rainey, Witches Broom,oil on canvas, 120 x 150 cm, 2016

Jane Rainey, oil on canvas, 2016

Jane Rainey,The Man behind the Curtain, oil on canvas, 90 x 120 cm,2016

Jane Rainey website

Joseph Heffernan – MFA Graduate, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, Cityscape, oil on canvas, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, Cityscape, oil on panel, 40 x 30 cm, 2016

The Paintings are about the day-to-day activities of being in the studio and the Quixotic nature of the working process. The characters in the paintings are ones that I chose to bring in to the studio for narrative reasons. This narrative involves a theatrical conflict between abstraction and figuration, play-fullness and melancholy, hopefulness and despair, and is used as a vehicle or stage for exploring the absurdity of things.        Joseph Heffernan

Joseph Heffernan, Flume, oil on panel, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, Flume, oil on panel, 25 x 20 cm, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, Crusade, oil on canvas, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, Crusade, oil on panel, 30 x 40 cm, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, The Comedian, oil on panel, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, The Comedian, oil on panel, 25 x 15 cm, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, The Rehearsal, oil on canvas, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, The Rehearsal, oil on panel, 90 x 70 cm 2016

Kiran Riaz – MFA Graduate, 2016

Kiran Riaz, East meets West, digital print on canvas, 8' x 5', 2016

Kiran Riaz, East meets West, digital print on canvas, 8′ x 5′, 2016

Kiran Riaz grew up in Pakistan and moved to Dublin for her MFA. Her practice revolves around the counterbalance between Western and Eastern cultures. The work deals with cultural perceptions and her own experience of living between East and West. Riaz explores beauty, terrorism, religion and stereotypes of Eastern men as adversaries post 9/11. She has combined the Pakistani textile motif of Ajarak with Irish lace patterns in a mosaic format, using Photoshop software and traditional miniature painting. The work alludes to the mysteries and layers of visual storytelling from both societies, by revealing and concealing our combined histories.

Kiran Riaz, Untitled, acrylic on canvass, 12 x 12 inches, 2016

Kiran Riaz, Untitled, acrylic on canvass, 12 x 12 inches, 2016

Kiran Riaz, performance, sketch printing on T-shirt, (Austin Hearne), 2016

Kiran Riaz, performance, sketch printing on T-shirt, (Austin Hearne), 2016

Kiran Riaz, Who am I, colour pencil, on canvas, 2016

Kiran Riaz, Who am I, colour pencil, on canvas, 2016

Kiran Riaz, Untitled, acrylics on canvas, 20x20 cm, 2016

Kiran Riaz, Untitled, acrylics on canvas, 20×20 cm, 2016

www.kiranriazart.com

Neo mannerism?

The theme of November’s MFA Painting seminar was Jerry Saltz’s article on neo-mannerism, Art’s Insidious New Cliché, published in http://www.vulture.com .

Read the text here.

Saltz berates artists for producing an ‘ever-expanding assembly of anaemically boring artistic clichés squeezing the life out of the art world right now.’

The question for us was, is this the case? If so, is Salz’s argument limited to New York? As one of the comments on his post states, ‘maybe you are not looking in the right place.’

In reference to painting, Saltz states, ‘Nowadays we see endless arrays of decorous, medium-sized, handsome, harmless paintings. It’s rendered mainly in black, white, gray or, more recently, violet or blue. Much of it entails transfer techniques, silkscreening, stencilling, assemblage, collage, a little spray painting or scraping and the like. There might be some smooshy blocks of colour or stripes or other obvious open-form abstraction or geometric motif.’ He then goes on to say that much of the current work references mostly male painters like Albert Oehlen, Christopher Wool, Michael Krebber, Wade Guyton, Laura Owens and Sergej Jensen.

Here is a summary of the arguments that were made ‘for’ and ‘against’ Jerry in our seminar. They do not necessarily reflect the views of the painting department or of everyone at the seminar.

FOR

In support of Jerry’s argument, we looked at a painting by Chantal Joffe, ‘Walking’ which was described as ‘dispassionate,’ in comparison to Maria Lassnig’s work. We looked at Sarah Faux, Patrick Brennan and Zachary Keeting.

Image

Chantal Joffe, Walking Woman, 2004, oil on board

Albert Oehlen Piece 2003 oil on canvas

Albert Oehlen
Piece
2003
oil on canvas

Sarah Faux Crawling Man 2012 oil and spray paint on canvas

Sarah Faux
Crawling Man
2012
oil and spray paint on canvas

 

Patrick Brennan Flow and Fade 2011 mixed media on canvas

Patrick Brennan
Flow and Fade
2011
mixed media on canvas

 

 

Zachary Keeting January (3) 2013  acrylic on canvas

Zachary Keeting
January (3)
2013
acrylic on canvas

 

Another group of works were shown: Luc Tuymans, Daniel Richter, Damien Hirst, and Thomas Hirschorn. The argument around these works is that they were ‘cynical.’ For example, that Tuymans seeming ability to paint any historical figure, here Condoleezza Rice, in monochromatic tones has become a mannerism.

Luc Tuymans, The Secretary of State, 2005, oil on canvas

Luc Tuymans, The Secretary of State, 2005, oil on canvas

Thomas Hirschorn

Thomas Hirschorn

We looked at the blog  structureandimagery.blogspot.ie, a contemporary art blog by Paul Behnke, which showed images of recent shows in Lower Manhattan and it was proposed that from the work shown, Saltz did have a valid criticism to make of current shows in New York.

AGAINST

Against Saltz’s argument, we looked at Scott Stack, Richard Roth and Tomma Abts, all influenced by artists such as Christopher Wool, mentioned in the article, but not falling into any neo-mannerist cliché, it was suggested. Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, seen in this year’s Turner Prize, was also cited as an artist whose work, at least, challenged the viewer’s assumptions about what contemporary figure painting could be.

Christopher Wool Untitled 2010 screen printing ink and enamel paint on paper

Christopher Wool
Untitled
2010
screen printing ink and enamel paint on paper

Scot Stack City of the Future 2011 oil paint on canvas

Scot Stack
City of the Future
2011
oil paint on canvas

Richard Roth  Shandy 2010 acrylic on MDF

Richard Roth
Shandy
2010
acrylic on MDF

Richard Roth  As Is 2011 acrylic on birch plywood

Richard Roth
As Is
2011
acrylic on birch plywood

Tomma Abts, Zebe, 2010, acrylic and oil on canvas

Tomma Abts, Zebe, 2010, acrylic and oil on canvas

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye

Chris Martin’s work has many influences from music, literature and film. He paints large-scale canvases and ‘paints on records, slices of white bread, pillows, aluminium foil, and uses copious amounts of glitter- materials that seem immune to artspeak’. In a recent interview by Ross Simonini, he was asked, “What’s your definition of ‘bad’ or ‘unsuccessful’?”

CM: ‘Well, that’s a wonderful question, because as an artist it’s very interesting sometimes to say, I’ll try to make a bad one. And often the kind of energy around the bad one is actually great.’

Chris Martin at Mitchell-Innes and Nash Gallery

Chris Martin at Mitchell-Innes and Nash Gallery

We also showed a group of works from the ‘Invisible- Art about the unseen, 1957-2012’ exhibition that was held at the Hayward Galley in 2012. The works were Jeppe Hein’s Invisible Labyrinth, Yves Klein, in the void room, 1961, Tom Friedman, 1000 hours, and Tino Seghal. The argument here was that if mannerism was a result of too much, an excess, then these works would offer some relief. They are visually low-key works, which invoke invisibility to underscore and direct our attention towards the unwritten rules that shape our understanding of art. A contrast to Jerry’s ‘post- formalist formal arrangements of clunky stuff, sticks, planks, bent metal, wood boxes, fabric old furniture, concrete things and whatnot leaned, stacked, piled or dispersed around a clean white gallery.’

Yves Klein in the Void Room (Raum der Leere). 1961

Yves Klein in the Void Room (Raum der Leere). 1961

 Tom Friedman. 1000hrs. 1992

Tom Friedman. 1000hrs. 1992

 Jeppe Hein, Invisible Labyrinth 2005

Jeppe Hein, Invisible Labyrinth 2005

Tino Sehgal

Jerry mentions Bjarne Melgaard at the beginning of the article and we examined his work. He works, sometimes collaboratively, on large-scale expressionistic paintings. His works are said to be created from ‘authentic impulses.’

Bjarne Melgaard and Erik Di Bella

Bjarne Melgaard and Erik Di Bella

Bjarne Melgaard and Ruben Lopez

Bjarne Melgaard and Ruben Lopez

We also looked at images from NCAD Painting department recent graduate, Sam Keogh,’s 2013 show at the Kerlin Gallery, Dublin, ‘Mop.’ The exhibition takes its premise from the character of Oscar the Grouch in the children’s television series Sesame Street, a character who collected dirty, messy and useless objects and whose presence in the programmes was to teach children to tolerate non-normative behaviours. The show consists of a vinyl floor covering, printed from Keogh’s drawings spliced together, spread across the entire floor of the gallery, on which are placed an array of images, sculptures and found objects. Although the presentation of the show ticks several of Saltz’s boxes, the way forms merge in and out of the background of the floor covering, and the way the viewer discovers the show over time and spends time with it and on it, the subtlety of the shifts in scale and consideration of detail and materials , all counteract Jerry’s argument.

Sam Keogh, Mop, 2013

Sam Keogh, Mop, 2013

Sam Keogh, Mop, 2013

Sam Keogh, Mop, 2013

Posted by Madeleine Moore

George Warren – MFA Graduate, 2013

George Warren, Head, 2012, acrylic on paper on board, 25 x 27 cm

George Warren, Head, 2012, acrylic on paper on board, 27 x 25 inches

Rather than living my art, I have a very real sense of my art living me. It is by giving the painting full licence to be whatever it needs to be, to go where it wants to go, that I can glimpse something of my own psychological make-up and complexities.

The most remarkable direction I have been given about painting has been to “embrace your ugliness”. I did not understand what this meant at the time but the strangeness of the remark stuck with me. I believe I now know what was intended by this odd piece of advice. It means this: to take complete ownership of ourselves and not to be selective or judgemental. Painting that speaks of who we think we are, or who we would like to be, or who we imagine ourselves to be, ultimately is of a much lesser interest than that which exposes one’s perceived flaws, frustrations, and follies, one’s darkest dreams, repressed memories and irrationalities. Putting one’s moments of madness on an equal footing with all other parts of one’s preferred make-up, is to provide a platform for a strategy of artistic freedom and potential fulfilment that would otherwise have been stifled and stemmed.

George Warren, Mermaid Blonde, 2013, mixed media on paper on board, 11x13 cm

George Warren, Mermaid Blonde, 2013, mixed media on paper on board, 11 x 13 inches

George Warren, Untitled, 2012, mixed media on paper on board, 14 x 11 cm

George Warren, Untitled, 2012, mixed media on paper on board, 11 x 14 inches

George Warren, Lipstick Blonde, 2013, acrylic, magic marker and lipstick on paper on board, 14.5 x 17 cm

George Warren, Lipstick Blonde, 2013, acrylic, magic marker and lipstick on paper on board, 14.5 x 17 inches

George Warren, Oscar's Tree, 2012-2013, acrylic on paper collage on board, 10.5 x 13 cm

George Warren, Oscar’s Tree, 2012-2013, acrylic on paper collage on board, 10.5 x 13 inches

George Warren, Pink Blonde, 2012, mixed media on paper on board, 15 x 19 cm

George Warren, Pink Blonde, 2012, mixed media on paper on board, 15 x 19 inches

Posted by George Warren

Eveleen Murphy – MFA Graduate, 2013

Eveleen Murphy, Reoccurring Nightmare 1990, acrylic on board, 46 x 37cm

Eveleen Murphy, Reoccurring Nightmare 1990, acrylic on board, 46 x 37cm

I make abstract paintings. For me it is all about process or the physical act of painting. I work intuitively with a sense urgency. Improvisation is important and I’m not conscious of the outcome and need to be continually surprised. It is this surprise that creates momentum and in turn informs my decision making process. With my current efforts I’ve opened up these spaces to a new dialogue, by working more hastily and unconcerned with previous marking. I attempted to bring an immediacy that is honest and brutal. My interest lies in the ability to balance visual opposites, from the garish, tacky, and glitter to chalky abstractions. My work could be deemed awkward and unseemly, whilst appearing scattered with undefined inconsistencies and outcomes that appear inconclusive yet to me are satisfying.

Posted by Eveleen Murphy. Website here.

Eveleen Murphy, The Way I See It, acrylic on board, 54cm x 41cm

Eveleen Murphy, The Way I See It, acrylic on board, 54cm x 41cm

Eveleen Murphy, The Way I See It, acrylic on board, 54cm x 41cm

Eveleen Murphy, The Way I See It, acrylic on board, 54cm x 41cm

Eveleen Murphy, Excess, acrylic on expanding foam with plasticine on brick, 45 x 34 x 26cm

Eveleen Murphy, Excess, acrylic on expanding foam with plasticine on brick, 45 x 34 x 26cm

Eveleen Murphy, Bits And Pieces, acrylic on board, 54 x 41cm

Eveleen Murphy, Bits And Pieces, acrylic on board, 54 x 41cm