Category Archives: Painting Research

Buse Kanlikilic – MFA Graduate, 2017

Buse Kanlikilic, Clematis, acrylic on fibreboard and wall. Dimensions variable

This work here explores the relationship between traditional Turkish arts and the process of image making in the context of contemporary art. Referencing ornamental patterns from the arts of the Ottoman Empire, familiar visual elements are combined with significant plant motifs and three dimensional installations -creating unique patterns that have a distinct language.

This body of work is called Disposition and it symbolises the pleasure of seeing; of being conscious of the world around me and finding the alchemy between the past and present.

Disposition extracts the floral and geometrical patterns from Ottoman ornamentation and reconfigures it through a painterly medium and process. The patterns are then repeatedly built, deconstructed and rebuilt.

Buse Kanlikilic, Violets on the Rug, acrylic on wall

The large murals in the first room draw inspiration from traditional Islamic ceramic tiles, pottery and textile arts such as carpets and embroidery; while the tension and synergy between the organic components and fractal patterns rediscover the importance of elemental rhythms of nature, in the second room.

Buse Kanlikilic, Tulip Mania, acrylic on hand cut oval wood

The materials used in the assembledges (housepaint, acrylic, spray paint, marker, fibreboard, paper, flowers, thread) are integral in highlighting the multifaceted nature of this installation. The layout, architecture and structure of the rooms were carefully considered throughout the process of creating an immersive atmosphere, whilst reconnecting myself with my roots in Turkish culture.

Buse Kanlikilic, Order and Rhythm, wax dipped carnations suspended from ceiling, 200 gsm paper flower installation

Buse Kanlikilic, Broken Pattern, acrylic on wall, acrylic on 6’x6′ canvases

Photographs by Zak Milofsky

Buse Kanlikilic

Frances O’Dwyer – MFA Graduate, 2017

Frances O’Dwyer, MFA Installation Somewhere between in here and out there, 2017, Mixed media.
Dimensions variable

Paint is incorporated into a broader exploration of media to become part of an assemblage, with recurring motifs suggesting a dialogue between object, image and material. Everyday observations, encounters and literature can become a starting point for the work. Collected lo fi, ready to hand material and remnants are used alongside paint, collage, drawing and text…I don’t see the assemblages as being that much different from a collection of small poems…there is a formal language applied in the making, that is a mixture of considered and intuitive responses to the placement of material and their corresponding space.

Frances O’Dwyer, MFA Installation Somewhere between in here and out there, 2017, Mixed media. Dimensions variable

Somewhere between in here and out there responds to the studio spaces in the annex building and their relationship to the domestic environment. Exploring ideas of intimacy and space, the work conflates the public and private through assemblages of disparate ‘things’ to reveal both our playful and poignant relationship to objects, materials and space. The individual works retain a precarious physicality to reflect something of the nature of the material world and our connection to it.

Frances O’Dwyer, MFA Installation Somewhere between in here and out there, 2017, Mixed media. Dimensions variable

Frances O’Dwyer, MFA Installation Somewhere between in here and out there, 2017, Mixed media. Dimensions variable

Meghan Heeney – MFA Graduate, 2017

Meghan Heeney, Unpredictable blackness, 2017, oil on canvas, 31 x 23cm

A moment. A silence. An experience of vastness and feeling informing those of a body, a female body rippling beneath the waves of interchanging events. Stains, colour, masking represent the sheet which makes us all universal. We all possess it yet differ so greatly, as what happens underneath our surface can only be individually felt. Therefore, can only be made visible by that of hand. We lose control, buried under the weight of its rawness. Internal innocence delicately exposed.

Meghan Heeney, You know me because I know you II, 2017, oil on canvas, 26cm x 20.5cm

Meghan Heeney, Internal innocence, 2017, oil on canvas , 140cm x 160cm

Meghan Heeney

Instagram @meghanheeneyartist_

Matthew Mitchell – MFA Graduate,2017

Matthew Mitchell, Bhoireann Am (Burren Time), installation. Photographs by Zak Milofsky

The work here is an attempt to find a visual language for the duality between our necessarily abstracted experience of place and being in the new digital landscape, and our perception of place and being in relation to the more tangible primeval geological past. It is an attempt to use the visual lexicon of the past to articulate and chronicle our experience of the transient, often invisible now.

Matthew Mitchell, Transgression, mixed media on board, 122x102cm, 2017

This interplay of past and present place and time exists in the intermingling organic and inorganic forms on the canvas, in the physical act of making the work and in the perceived embodied experience of what is made. The processes used in the studio echo the naturally occurring processes of concealment and revelation in the physical act of erosion in the natural environment.

Matthew Mitchell, Quintessence, mixed media on board, 122x102cm, 2017

Organic material such as fine river clay taken from the Caher river bed is applied in layers, and then weathered over time. The act of construction in the layering and the deconstruction of etching and sanding and dissolving, and the transformational potential of the material, enables the observed materiality of the landscape to be embodied in the tactile surface of the piece.

Matthew Mitchell, After Ptolemy, mixed media on canvas, 68x55cm, 2017

At the same time, the use of the reflective qualities of enamel on textured coloured surfaces allows forms to appear and disappear, their visual reality in time shifting and impermanent. The inorganic materiality of the enamel and its translucence allows it to be part of the whole, but with a different separate narrative.

Matthew Mitchell, Immrama (The Navigations), mixed media on board, 122x102cm, 2017

Matthew Mitchell, Mare Incognitum, mixed media on canvas, 68x55cm, 2016

Matthew Mitchell, Marl Glyph, mixed media on canvas, 137x103cm, 2017

Ann Ensor – MFA Graduate, 2017

Ann Ensor, Fusing Forces. Installation detail, Marble dust, Mica Pigments, Rabbit Skin Glue layered onto walls. 2017

My work explores the umwelt, and the spaces and porous boundaries between all entities, and how they relate with the environment and each other. Through physically experiencing the work, I want to show the necessity for us humans to share this planet with all other entities rather than dominate it. I work through paint, sculpture, and sound.

Ann Ensor, Fusing Forces. Installation detail, Marble dust, Mica Pigments, Rabbit Skin Glue

Ann Ensor, Fusing Forces Installation detail, Marble dust, Mica Pigment, Rabbit Skin Glue on Floor, 60x30cm

Ann Ensor, Fusing Forces Installation Detail, Marble Dust, Mica Pigments, Rabbit Skin Glue

Ann Ensor, Fusing Forces Installation Detail, Steam Bent Oak Sculpture, French chalk, Marble Dust,Mica Pigments, Rabbit Skin Glue, 4.2mx2mx2m

Ann Ensor        Instagram    ensorann

 

Louisa Casas – MFA Graduate, 2017

Louisa Casas, Installation view MFA show 2017.

SUPERFICIES:SURFACE

Addressing the sense of our increasing disembodiment in a reality mediated through the digital realm this work represents a counter balance to re-anchor physicality. Contrasted use of materiality and scale emphasise surface, texture, line, bulk and form.

Louisa Casas, ‘Eyes eyes shimmer and shine’ 2017 oil & mixed media on canvas, 30x40cm

Traditional media of paint and canvas are juxtaposed with works combining synthetic materials, not only fused within the surface of paint, but made also as sculptural pieces to emphasise the reinstatement of form.

Louisa Casas, installation view MFA show, 2017. Photo Zak Milofsky

Referencing the deconstructed physicality of imagery the combined works are about the materiality of making and question the future of our own sense of presence in the slick intangible surface of the virtual.

The hybrid nature of our digital experience is transcribed through mimicking the imagery and shapes of stickers from popular culture and body part assembly games of childhood. In a playful way these images question the veracity of our reconstituted pixelated identity.

Louisa Casas, ‘Torso unscrolled’ 2017 oil paint, glue, vinyl film, foam, synthetic fibre on canvas, 160x125cms.

Louisa Casas, Installation view ‘Of body part/glancing by’ 2017, oil on canvas, 28 x 34cm

Louisa Casas, ‘Oh Form’ 2017 oil paint, synthetic fabric & padding on canvas 60x50cm.

Louisa Casas    Instagram @louisa.casas

Kurt Oppermann – MFA Graduate, 2017

Kurt Oppermann, MFA installation. Photograph by Zak Milofsky

I use the figure as a space to examine the limits of the body. This work  approaches   the body as a situation where the organization of its components  can be re structured and altered. The formalities of scale,  physicality,  volume and density are altered and adjusted throughout the process  and this deliberate misuse of the figure attempts to draw out  nuances and absurdities. The actions involved in the thinking and doing become articulated, drawing out the disparity and contradictions between the two processes.

Kurt Oppermann, MFA installation. Photograph by Zak Milofsky

Cartoon-like and contorted figures find an uncomfortable harmony as the paintings develop.The idea of a figure attempting to build itself in order to survive lies at the basis of the work. The body becomes the space for managing an ongoing set of social interactions and relationships. The relentless codifying and abstraction of the world becomes a playground of observation. The absurdity must be embraced in order to function and is then handed back to the world, perhaps more relevant and contingent than before. The awkward and the irresolute within the painting become part and parcel of its completion.

Kurt Oppermann, Man Walking, Oil and marker on canvas, 50 x 70 cm

Kurt Oppermann, Man Walking, Oil and marker on canvas, 50 x 70

The flattening out of  the image is an attempt to break with perspective and orientate the viewer into the making of the work. The figurative aspects operate as entry points into the work. Acrylic and oil marker pens draw over the surface of the paint  to unsettle and redirect the images formation. This also functions as the most direct way to recapture the initial intent that drove the paintings conception.

The distinct marker lines reference the exaggerated forms of Cubism while also taking influence from the marks of graffiti and the “DIY” instructional diagrams of the digital age. These styles combine ideas of  sculptural forms and the reorganization of space to obscure and redefine.   I attempt to create a new situation where the figure becomes dislocated  but  free to be reconfigured in to a new space where a functioning body can exist.

Kurt Oppermann, Precursor, Oil and marker on canvas, 50 x 40 cm.

Kurt Oppermann, MFA installation. Photograph by Zak Milofsky

Kurt Oppermann, MFA installation. Photograph by Zak Milofsky

Kurt Oppermann   Instagram @kurt_oppermann