Louisa Casas – MFA Graduate, 2017

Louisa Casas, Installation view MFA show 2017.

SUPERFICIES:SURFACE

Addressing the sense of our increasing disembodiment in a reality mediated through the digital realm this work represents a counter balance to re-anchor physicality. Contrasted use of materiality and scale emphasise surface, texture, line, bulk and form.

Louisa Casas, ‘Eyes eyes shimmer and shine’ 2017 oil & mixed media on canvas, 30x40cm

Traditional media of paint and canvas are juxtaposed with works combining synthetic materials, not only fused within the surface of paint, but made also as sculptural pieces to emphasise the reinstatement of form.

Louisa Casas, installation view MFA show, 2017. Photo Zak Milofsky

Referencing the deconstructed physicality of imagery the combined works are about the materiality of making and question the future of our own sense of presence in the slick intangible surface of the virtual.

The hybrid nature of our digital experience is transcribed through mimicking the imagery and shapes of stickers from popular culture and body part assembly games of childhood. In a playful way these images question the veracity of our reconstituted pixelated identity.

Louisa Casas, ‘Torso unscrolled’ 2017 oil paint, glue, vinyl film, foam, synthetic fibre on canvas, 160x125cms.

Louisa Casas, Installation view ‘Of body part/glancing by’ 2017, oil on canvas, 28 x 34cm

Louisa Casas, ‘Oh Form’ 2017 oil paint, synthetic fabric & padding on canvas 60x50cm.

Louisa Casas    Instagram @louisa.casas

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Kurt Oppermann – MFA Graduate, 2017

Kurt Oppermann, MFA installation. Photograph by Zak Milofsky

I use the figure as a space to examine the limits of the body. This work  approaches   the body as a situation where the organization of its components  can be re structured and altered. The formalities of scale,  physicality,  volume and density are altered and adjusted throughout the process  and this deliberate misuse of the figure attempts to draw out  nuances and absurdities. The actions involved in the thinking and doing become articulated, drawing out the disparity and contradictions between the two processes.

Kurt Oppermann, MFA installation. Photograph by Zak Milofsky

Cartoon-like and contorted figures find an uncomfortable harmony as the paintings develop.The idea of a figure attempting to build itself in order to survive lies at the basis of the work. The body becomes the space for managing an ongoing set of social interactions and relationships. The relentless codifying and abstraction of the world becomes a playground of observation. The absurdity must be embraced in order to function and is then handed back to the world, perhaps more relevant and contingent than before. The awkward and the irresolute within the painting become part and parcel of its completion.

Kurt Oppermann, Man Walking, Oil and marker on canvas, 50 x 70 cm

Kurt Oppermann, Man Walking, Oil and marker on canvas, 50 x 70

The flattening out of  the image is an attempt to break with perspective and orientate the viewer into the making of the work. The figurative aspects operate as entry points into the work. Acrylic and oil marker pens draw over the surface of the paint  to unsettle and redirect the images formation. This also functions as the most direct way to recapture the initial intent that drove the paintings conception.

The distinct marker lines reference the exaggerated forms of Cubism while also taking influence from the marks of graffiti and the “DIY” instructional diagrams of the digital age. These styles combine ideas of  sculptural forms and the reorganization of space to obscure and redefine.   I attempt to create a new situation where the figure becomes dislocated  but  free to be reconfigured in to a new space where a functioning body can exist.

Kurt Oppermann, Precursor, Oil and marker on canvas, 50 x 40 cm.

Kurt Oppermann, MFA installation. Photograph by Zak Milofsky

Kurt Oppermann, MFA installation. Photograph by Zak Milofsky

Kurt Oppermann   Instagram @kurt_oppermann

Rauschenberg at Tate Modern

Robert Rauschenberg, Retroactive 11 1964, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago

Robert Rauschenberg blazed a new trail for art in the second half of the twentieth century.

This landmark exhibition celebrates his extraordinary six-decade career, taking you on a dazzling adventure through modern art in the company of a truly remarkable artist.

From paintings including flashing lights to a stuffed angora goat, Rauschenberg’s appetite for incorporating things he found in the streets of New York knew no limits. Pop art silkscreen paintings of Kennedy sit alongside 1000 gallons of bentonite mud bubbling to its own rhythm. Rauschenberg even made a drawing which was sent to the moon.

Each room captures a different moment of this rich journey, from Rauschenberg’s early response to abstract expressionism to his final works saturated in images and colour. Seen together they show how Rauschenberg rethought the possibilities for art in our time.

This exhibition, organised in collaboration with The Museum of Modern Art, New York, is the first full-scale retrospective since the artist’s death in 2008 and the ultimate Rauschenberg experience. It is your one chance to see these major international loans together in one place, while discovering the full story of an inspirational and much-loved artist whose influence is still felt today.

Robert Rauschenberg, Charlene, 1954, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam

Robert Rauschenberg, Almanac, 1962

Exhibition organised by Tate Modern and The Museum of Modern Art, New York

Under 30’s to Watch

Fresh Irish painters: 10 under 30 to watch – selected for the RTE blog by Cristín Leech, art critic of The Sunday Times. Seven of the ten graduated from NCAD.

Darragh Dempsey, A Matter of Time, 206, oil on birch plywood, 30.2x45.5 cm

Darragh Dempsey, A Matter of Time, 206, oil on birch plywood, 30.2×45.5 cm

Amanda Doran, Dead, 2013, Oil on Board

Amanda Doran, Dead, 2013, Oil on Board

Joe Scullion, Off Course, 2014, oil on board, 44.5x40cm

Joe Scullion, Off Course, 2014, oil on board, 44.5x40cm

 

Eileen O’Sullivan, Unceremonious, II, oil on canvas, 2016

Eileen O’Sullivan, Unceremonious, II, oil on canvas, 2016

Jane Rainey, Sun Burst, oil on canvas, 2016, 50x40cm

Jane Rainey, Sun Burst, oil on canvas, 2016, 50x40cm

Shane Berkery, oil on canvas

Shane Berkery, oil on canvas

Chanelle Walshe, Telesthesia, oil on board. 50x40cm. 2015

Chanelle Walshe, Telesthesia, oil on board. 50x40cm. 2015

Click on artists names and be taken to their websites:

Darragh Dempsey, Amanda Doran, Eileen O’Sullivan, Jane Rainey, Shane Berkery, Chanelle Walshe                     

Posted by Robert Armstrong

Jane Rainey – MFA Graduate, 2016

Jane Rainey, oil on canvas, 2016

Jane Rainey, Toxicity, oil on canvas, 40 x 50cm, 2016

 

The paintings often describe no specific events, with the beginning, the end and the transgressive or progressive middle, often folding in on each other. The works are always in a state of flux, living somewhere in-between representation and abstraction, depicting things that are of this world but also not of this world. Tangible things that you can almost touch collide with unrecognisable abstract marks that are very much involved and about the act of painting. The worlds are suspended in time, with no sense of gravity, living within a liminal space that is neither here nor there. Bright in colour the works pulsate against each other causing harmonious connections as well as uneasy clashes. A sense of overwhelming uneasy and awkwardness occupy the painting, alluding that all is not what it seems.

Jane Rainey, oil on canvas, 2016

Jane Rainey, In Response to the infinite Scream of Nature,oil on canvas, 40 x 50 cm. 2016

Jane Rainey, oil on canvas, 2016

Jane Rainey, Witches Broom,oil on canvas, 120 x 150 cm, 2016

Jane Rainey, oil on canvas, 2016

Jane Rainey,The Man behind the Curtain, oil on canvas, 90 x 120 cm,2016

Jane Rainey website

Joseph Heffernan – MFA Graduate, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, Cityscape, oil on canvas, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, Cityscape, oil on panel, 40 x 30 cm, 2016

The Paintings are about the day-to-day activities of being in the studio and the Quixotic nature of the working process. The characters in the paintings are ones that I chose to bring in to the studio for narrative reasons. This narrative involves a theatrical conflict between abstraction and figuration, play-fullness and melancholy, hopefulness and despair, and is used as a vehicle or stage for exploring the absurdity of things.        Joseph Heffernan

Joseph Heffernan, Flume, oil on panel, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, Flume, oil on panel, 25 x 20 cm, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, Crusade, oil on canvas, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, Crusade, oil on panel, 30 x 40 cm, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, The Comedian, oil on panel, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, The Comedian, oil on panel, 25 x 15 cm, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, The Rehearsal, oil on canvas, 2016

Joseph Heffernan, The Rehearsal, oil on panel, 90 x 70 cm 2016

Kiran Riaz – MFA Graduate, 2016

Kiran Riaz, East meets West, digital print on canvas, 8' x 5', 2016

Kiran Riaz, East meets West, digital print on canvas, 8′ x 5′, 2016

Kiran Riaz grew up in Pakistan and moved to Dublin for her MFA. Her practice revolves around the counterbalance between Western and Eastern cultures. The work deals with cultural perceptions and her own experience of living between East and West. Riaz explores beauty, terrorism, religion and stereotypes of Eastern men as adversaries post 9/11. She has combined the Pakistani textile motif of Ajarak with Irish lace patterns in a mosaic format, using Photoshop software and traditional miniature painting. The work alludes to the mysteries and layers of visual storytelling from both societies, by revealing and concealing our combined histories.

Kiran Riaz, Untitled, acrylic on canvass, 12 x 12 inches, 2016

Kiran Riaz, Untitled, acrylic on canvass, 12 x 12 inches, 2016

Kiran Riaz, performance, sketch printing on T-shirt, (Austin Hearne), 2016

Kiran Riaz, performance, sketch printing on T-shirt, (Austin Hearne), 2016

Kiran Riaz, Who am I, colour pencil, on canvas, 2016

Kiran Riaz, Who am I, colour pencil, on canvas, 2016

Kiran Riaz, Untitled, acrylics on canvas, 20x20 cm, 2016

Kiran Riaz, Untitled, acrylics on canvas, 20×20 cm, 2016

www.kiranriazart.com